Beer Bread

Any other beer drankers out there? I love many different styles of beer, but the dark beers are my very favorite. Love those creamy stouts and roasty porters.

I would probably say that Great Lakes Brewing Company’s Edmund Fitzgerald Porter (affectionately dubbed “Eddy Fitz,” by many) is my favorite beer.

I bring up the topic of beer because this weekend I made homemade BEER BREAD! (If you follow me on Instagram you may have caught a sneak peek.)

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Last week I caught an episode of Good Eats in which Alton Brown was making Beer Bread and it just looked So Dang Easy that I decided I absolutely must try it!

So the next day I did.

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If you’ve never baked homemade bread before, this is a good place to start.

There is no rising. No proofing. No yeast to activate.

Simply combine dry ingredients, add a few snips of fresh dill, shredded cheddar, and a 12 ounce bottle (or can) of the beer of your choice.

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I chose Guinness, because, well, I was wanting to use a dark beer for my bread and Guinness was on sale at the grocery store. Alton Brown used a pale ale. Use whatever you like. Twelve ounces.

And please crack another cold one open to sip on, while you’re at it.

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After stirring the mixture just until combined (don’t over stir!), simply pour the batter into a greased loaf pan and pop it into the oven for 45-55 minutes. That is IT!

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Before you know it, your house will smell like homemade bread.

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I sprinkled sesame seeds atop my bread batter prior to baking. You could also use sunflower seeds, pepitas, or anything crunchy.

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I simply could not resist slicing a small piece off the end while the loaf was warm!P1100918_c

Nom!

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I still cannot get over how incredibly easy this recipe is. And the payoff is so rewarding – homemade bread! I really loved it. The bread will not rise much while baking, and remains rather dense, but I found my loaf to be fairly moist.

I would suggest coarsely shredding, or even finely dicing, the cheese, as opposed to finely shredding it, because I loved the chunks of cheese dispersed throughout the loaf. The beer flavor was present, but it wasn’t bold at all. Mostly just some of the malty, roasty undertones of the Guinness stout were present.

How perfect would this bread be with a Broccoli Cheddar Soup!? Pretty dang perfect.

I happened to pair with homemade Clam Chowder which was also a rather splendid combination.

Try it out!

Beer Bread

Adapted from Alton Brown

Ingredients

  • Nonstick spray
  • 8 ounces all-purpose flour (about 1.5 cups)
  • 4 ounces whole-wheat flour (about 3/4 cup)
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt (reduced from 1.5 tsp in the original recipe, per reviewers’ comments)
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 1 teaspoon chopped fresh dill
  • 4 1/2 ounces sharp Cheddar, grated
  • 12 ounces cold beer, ale or stout
  • 1 to 2 tablespoons sunflower seeds, pepitas, or sesame seeds, optional

Directions

  1. Heat the oven to 375 degrees F. Coat the inside of a 9 by 5-inch loaf pan with the nonstick spray and set aside.
  2. Whisk together the all-purpose flour, wheat flour, baking powder, salt, sugar, and dill in a large mixing bowl. Add in the cheese and stir in the beer just to combine. Spread the batter evenly in the prepared pan. Sprinkle with seeds or nuts, if using.
  3. Bake on the middle rack of the oven until the bread reaches an internal temperature of 210 degrees F on an instant-read thermometer, about 45 to 55 minutes. (I baked for about 47 minutes in my oven and I did not use a thermometer).
  4. Remove from the oven and cool in the pan for 10 minutes. Transfer the loaf to a cooling rack for 10 to 15 minutes before slicing and serving.

In case my wonky cartoon filter was just a leeeetle (or a lot) too much for you, here is a non-edited picture of the bread!

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Other Alton Brown Recipes I’ve Tried:

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8 thoughts on “Beer Bread

  1. I’m not a huge fan of stouts and porters, but can totally appreciate them. I’m a huge fan of Beligian sours and am wondering if one would make it somewhat of a sourdough bread.. But then, the thought of not drinking it is hurting my head.

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